History Quiz

This catagory contains questions and answers about historical events, periods, places and persons.

Subcategories

World War II

World War II

WW2 Quiz
World War I

World War I

World War I Quiz
The Cold War

The Cold War

The Cold War Quiz
Roman Empire

Roman Empire

Roman Empire History Quiz
Ancient Egypt

Ancient Egypt

Ancient Egypt History Quiz
Viking Age

Viking Age

Viking Age History Quiz
Ancient Greece

Ancient Greece

Ancient Greece History Quiz
Stone Age

Stone Age

Stone Age History Quiz
Bronze Age

Bronze Age

Bronze Age History Quiz
Iron Age

Iron Age

Iron Age History Quiz
Middle Ages

Middle Ages

Middle Ages History Quiz
16th Century

16th Century

16th Century History Quiz
18th Century

18th Century

18th Century History Quiz
17th Century

17th Century

17th Century History Quiz
19th Century

19th Century

19th Century History Quiz
20th Century

20th Century

20th Century History Quiz
21st Century

21st Century

21st Century History Quiz
14th Century

14th Century

14th Century History Quiz
15th Century

15th Century

15th Century Quiz
13th Century

13th Century

13th Century History Quiz
History Trivia

History Trivia

History Trivia Quiz

History

Questions in this Quiz

Which of the following is equal to the number to the total number of days in a fortnight?

What classic comic strip character is known for the catchphrase "Leapin' Lizards!"?

Pollyanna is a 1913 novel by American author Eleanor H. Porter and the first of a series of twelve books which became know as what?

Though it can be traced back to the 1500s, the proverb "Tomorrow is another day" was popularized by what author?

What author of "The Handmaid's Tale" has argued that her novels are "speculative fiction", not science fiction?

What author is often credited with being the first person to submit a book manuscript written on a typewriter?

What is the correct spelling of the word that refers to the Middle Ages in Europe?

The Spanish-American War began in 1898 as an intervention by the United States on behalf of what country?

"Picayune" was once a Spanish coin worth half of what?

The song "Over The River and Through The Woods" was originally an 1844 poem about what holiday?

What U.S. city was founded by 11 men, 11 women, 22 children, and 4 soldiers, collectively known as "Los Pobladores"?

What U.S. state's capital was named after "the Most Holy Sacrament of the Body and blood of Christ"?

Posters of famous Irish writers proudly displayed in pubs often feature all but which of the following?

Referenced in Shakespeare's nickname "the bard of Avon", the Avon is a what?

What classic novel is mentioned in a 2002 biography of Shania Twain even though she and the novel's author are unrelated?

Presumably named after the love of his life, "The Olive" is a boat belonging to what character?

What classic cartoon character has a romantic rival named Bluto?

The site of a famous 1839 slave mutiny, the 19th-century ship La Amistad has a name that means what in Spanish?

Referring to an old-fashioned term for feline appreciation, which of these is the name of a long-running magazine?

Which Baldwin brother wrote "The Unusual Suspect", an account of becoming an evangelical Christian?

What poet is commonly credited with writing the traditional lyrics to the New Year's Eve Song "Auld Lang Syne"

The magazine "Decanter" promotes itself as the "bible" for collectors and connoisseurs of what?

Though not confirmed by the author, Johnny Fontane, the singer in "The Godfather", is believed to be based on whom?

Published in 1798, a well-known poem by Samuel Taylor Coleridge is titled "The Rime of the Ancient" what?

The expression "Perfect Storm" is widely believed to have been coined by what bestselling author?

The outlaw Robert Ford is remembered as a "coward" for doing what to his gang leader Jesse James?

Shakespeare's "Romeo and Juliet" is set primarily in Verona, a city in what country?

The title of the 1927 novel "Treasure of the Sierra Madre" refers to a mountain range in what country/

Though it is often quoted, the line "Elementary, my dear Watson" never actually appears in the works of what author?

When England adopted the new Gregorian calendar in 1752, people complained that they "lost" how many days?

The French phrase "fin de siecle" would most likely refer to the events occurring in which of these years?

The rebellious "Beat Generation writers flourished in the U.S. during which of these decades?

The site of a big loss for Colonel Cluster, Wyoming's Little Bighorn is which of the following?

The original cover art of the children's classic "Charlotte's Web" features all but which of the following?

What was the first name of the man who created Webster's dictionary?

What's unusual about the way Ziggy, the loveable comic strip character, is commonly depicted?

What noted African-American writer collaborated on "The Autobiography of Malcolm X"?

Though they suspected it was hazardous, the ancient Romans extensively used what material in their water pipes?

What well-known patriotic song features the line "From sea to shining sea"?

The 2008 autobiography "Audition" chronicles the storied career of what female journalist?

Shel Silverstein spent over three years on the bestseller lists with his 1981 book "A Light in the" what?

What columnist once received over 15,000 letters after opining about which way a toilet paper roll should hang?

Though her recent work is Christian-themed, what novelist announced in 2010 she was leaving Christianity

What NASA mission's stated primary objective was, simply, "Perform a manned lunar landing and return"?

Published in 2004, "No Woman No Cry" is the memoir of what legendary singer's widow?

The monthly magazine "Cuesport" is primarily targeted toward enthusiasts of what game?

Reflecting on a subject he masters, Garry Kasperov's 2007 book is titled "How Life Imitates" what?

Which of the following is a hip-sounding chapter title in Stephen Hawking's "A Brief History of Time"?

The subject of a famous Revolutionary War poem, the "shot heard 'round the world" was fired in what U.S. state?

"Strike one the umpire said", is a line from what famous poem?